Morning Report: The Fed is concerned about coronavirus

Vital Statistics:

 

Last Change
S&P futures 3379 -6.25
Oil (WTI) 53.76 0.45
10 year government bond yield 1.54%
30 year fixed rate mortgage 3.69%

 

Stocks are lower this morning on no real news. Bonds and MBS are up.

 

The FOMC minutes didn’t reveal anything too surprising. The central bank is concerned about coronavirus, and the situation “warranted close watching.” In his Humphrey Hawkins testimony, Jerome Powell said he wanted to see evidence that Chinese disruptions are having a material effect on the US economy that will last. China is idling factories and restricting travel, and companies are now seeing the downside of stretched supply chains. In addition they fretted about persistently low inflation and searched for reasons why it has consistently missed their 2% target to the downside. Basically the message is that if rates are going anywhere, it is down not up.

 

In other economic news, initial jobless claims came in at 210,000 and the Philadelphia Fed manufacturing survey surged to a robust level of 37.

 

Mortgage delinquencies are the lowest on record (going back to 2000).  The total 30 day + DQ rate came in at 3.22%, which was down 14% YOY and down 5% on a MOM basis. This is unusual given that DQs often spike early in the year as holiday spending gets the better of people.

92 Responses

    • sure they are. but, compared to what the left wants to do…

      Like

      • Neither side cares about deficits. Republicans are awful on deficits and always have been, frequently worse than the Democrats.

        That being said, Democrats want to raise our taxes and also be worse on deficits. So if I’ve got to pick between two parties who are completely awful on deficits, I’m going to pick the one less likely to take more of my money.

        Like

  1. And Trump just went positive on job approval:

    He is now at 49% approve, 48% disapprove. First time he’s ever had more approve than disapprove since Gallup has been polling on him.

    https://news.gallup.com/poll/286280/trump-job-approval-steady.aspx

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    • jnc:

      He is now at 49% approve, 48% disapprove. First time he’s ever had more approve than disapprove since Gallup has been polling on him.

      My wife had an old college friend visit us a couple weeks ago. Lifelong democrat, dyed in the wool, Massachusetts liberal. Generally speaking we would avoid talking politics to keep things agreeable. But at some point the subject of Trump came up (her teenage son is rebelling and toying with conservatism…egads!) and she said “I really hate Trump, but I have to admit, things are really good. Financially we are better off than before Trump.” When I heard her of all people say that, I was convinced that Trump is going to win.

      Liked by 1 person

      • My teenage son and his friends aren’t buying the identity politics stuff the left is selling any more either. I suspect his generation will be similar to mine (Gen X).

        I remember triggering all of the hippies at the People’s Republic of Madison with my Reagan / Bush ’84 button on my backpack.

        And here in Westchester County NY, unless you actively and loudly detest Trump, people consider you a KKK member.

        Like

      • When I heard her of all people say that, I was convinced that Trump is going to win.

        It’s a perfect storm for Trump. Historically, presidents in his position almost always won re-election. No credible 3rd party, no credible primary challenger, first term for Republicans back in office after 8 years of a Dem President, and power of incumbency. Mix in schisms amongst Democrats and the strong economy—it would be a miracle if he lost, no matter how idiotic he sounds sometimes.

        NeverTrumpers and Dems have cemented his image as an outsider the DC swamp is terrified of. Current PC culture is alienating even center left folks and is associated with Dems politically.

        I predict at least one more state goes Trump and he comes much closer to winning the popular vote.

        Like

  2. Good read:

    “The Democratic establishment is both terrified of its front-runner and incapable of taking effective, unified action against him. Sounds a lot like the GOP in 2016.”

    https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2020/02/bloomberg-problem-every-candidate-sanders/606856/

    Like

    • That’s exactly what I saw last night. Warren was really attacking Bloomberg and he didn’t respond very well. Sanders jumped on that bandwagon and then Pete B and Amy K battled it out between themselves on really inconsequential matters…………..in my opinion. Sanders came out smelling like a rose and actually so did Warren but she’s too far behind Bernie at this point. I can’t vote for either of them so here I am again…………no good choices. I wish the Dems would get their act together. I predict an easy win for Trump at this point.

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      • I’m hesitant to predict easy wins—I expect Trump will win, because the power of incumbency is strong and it’s rare that the incumbent loses after the first term of their party being back in the Whitehouse, no matter what other issues are in play. But this won’t be Reagan v. Mondale. Dems have many other issues, but a split base is a big one. Lots of Bernie Bros voted for Trump. Others just didn’t vote. I see Warren fans and Bernie fans largely eschewing the chosen Dem candidate if it’s not their guy.

        I’m of the opinion Bernie could have won nationally in 2016 if he was the candidate but in 2020 I don’t think he can.

        Also I feel like Warren couldn’t build bridges after if she got the nomination, and Bloomberg might actually want to see her lose. Which wouldn’t help, Bernie Bros are getting such a bad rap I feel like Bernie won’t be able to appeal to voters outside his hardcore base.

        Also strong economy and Trump’s name recognition work to his favor.

        Still there are rarely cakewalks in presidential politics, as Hillary discovered.

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        • Kevin, that prediction was based on Wednesday’s debate performances. I’m hoping my prediction will change.

          Like

  3. Worth noting vis-a-vis the Barr interference issue:

    “Prosecutors took a fairly aggressive posture toward Stone — which itself is notable given what had happened the week before the hearing.

    The initial team of four career prosecutors recommended that Jackson impose a term of seven to nine years, only to see Trump tweet about the matter, and Barr personally intervene. All four prosecutors then quit the case — with one leaving the government entirely — and their replacements filed a new recommendation suggesting that three to four years was “more typical” in cases like Stone’s.

    The new prosecutors in court Thursday adopted the same technical arguments of their predecessors early in the proceedings and defended the Justice Department’s decision to bring the case.

    “This prosecution is righteous,” Assistant U.S. Attorney John Crabb said.

    Crabb said the court “should impose a substantial period of incarceration,” although he did not propose a specific number of months or years. “The court will rely on its own sound judgment and experience,” he said.”

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/public-safety/roger-stone-sentence-due-thursday-in-federal-court/2020/02/19/2e01bfc8-4c38-11ea-9b5c-eac5b16dafaa_story.html

    Like

  4. New York State sues NYC over taxi medallions:

    Liked by 1 person

    • McWing, not really seeing anything in that link……….could you just copy the tweet?

      Like

    • I’d forgotten about that shooting. I didn’t know at the time that the shooter was a Bernie supporter in 2016. It doesn’t make any sense at all to hold candidates responsible for the actions of their supporters.

      I do think riling supporters up with hateful rhetoric is a recipe for disaster though.

      Like

      • lms:

        I didn’t know at the time that the shooter was a Bernie supporter in 2016.

        Which is a pretty big indictment of the media. I’d wager almost anything that if a Trump supporter shot a Senate Democrat, there is no way you wouldn’t have known it.

        Like

        • Or quite possibly I wasn’t following that kind of news much in those days. I hated that election cycle and I’m trying not to hate this one. It’s a close call though.

          Both of our daughter’s were married that year so I was a little busy…………..;-)

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        • lms:

          Or quite possibly I wasn’t following that kind of news much in those days.

          Possibly, but I reckon that if a Trump supporter shot a Senate Democrat, the media coverage would be such that you’d have to be living as an off-the-grid recluse in order for it not to have seeped into your consciousness.

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      • lms:

        I do think riling supporters up with hateful rhetoric is a recipe for disaster though.

        Does labelling someone a traitor, a fascist, or a racist count as hateful rhetoric?

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        • Yes. I think there is way too much of that kind of language in politics today. I realize you’re probably talking about Dems here. Trump tends to rile people up too. It’s one of the reasons I’m giving up on politics. I’ll let the next generation figure it out after this election.

          Like

  5. Hmmmmm, I’m a very established member of a fitness site, called My Fitness Pal, and have been since September 2013. I doubt any of you remember how sick I was in 2012 from food poisoning that landed in my liver and I nearly died, but regardless of that, I’ve been a constant presence at MFP and have several private groups going and also just try really hard to encourage others on their fitness journey.

    About a week ago I told my friends there I was going to be spending more time on a political blog than there, since it’s an election year. One thing we don’t do there is talk politics.

    A really good friend of mine asked about our blog and wanted a link to it. She is a very progressive veteran/dentist who lives in the South. She just informed me her husband is probably to the left of Bernie………….LOL

    I tried to encourage both of them to post here but I don’t have a lot of hope that they will.

    Anyway, just thought I’d warn you in case they show up! I could use someone here to the left of me!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I doubt any of you remember how sick I was in 2012 from food poisoning that landed in my liver and I nearly died,

      I do!

      I tried to encourage both of them to post here but I don’t have a lot of hope that they will.

      In all sincerity I hope they do.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I hope they do too but I kind of doubt they will. This is a very intimidating place with most of you agreeing, in essence.

        I remember the days when we had Emily, Sue, Michi and a few more liberal guys……….that was so much fun!

        With Trump there and probably winning again there’s not that much to discuss really. I’m super worried about the fact that Obama’s ACA is in the courts because I think it would set a lot of us back if it’s unwinded. Other than that I’m not that encouraged to vote or participate.

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        • lms:

          I hope they do too but I kind of doubt they will. This is a very intimidating place with most of you agreeing, in essence.

          Personally, I would much rather post in a place where everyone else disagrees with me than where everyone else agrees with me. That’s why I ended up at PL originally.

          Like

        • There is some disagreement here, just not extreme. In most cases.

          But most places with serious discussion tend to filter down to a group of people who don’t have huge disagreements. One side or the other tends to bail I’ve found—and the group filters down to folks who kind of agree on most big things. But disagree in areas and have different areas of expertise and that makes discussions interesting.

          I’d like more cogent argument from folks who disagree—and preferably avoiding discussion of the other person’s character or moral quality as part of the disagreement. That rarely leads to constructive discussion.

          Like

        • We did have some pretty personal attacks happening in those days Kevin. It was a very volatile time in politics. I’ll stick around and see if I can find something to debate with you guys. I’ll try to make it to the election but then I’ll go back to my normal debates……………..is running or lifting weights better, keto vs counting calories, etc.

          Like

        • lms:

          We did have some pretty personal attacks happening in those days Kevin.

          But I stuck around anyway, despite the attacks on me!

          Like

        • Yes you did. I stuck around for a long time too despite QB’s attacks.

          Like

    • lms:

      Anyway, just thought I’d warn you

      Probably more important that you warn them!

      Liked by 1 person

  6. *Warning-Counter Narrative!*

    Like

  7. I find it so ironic that Canada seems to be the destination of choice for all those people claiming to be wanting to flee from Trump as a threat to their Constitutional rights.

    https://thefederalist.com/2020/02/21/heartbroken-dad-of-trans-teen-breaks-gag-to-beg-for-end-of-state-sponsored-child-abuse/

    Feeling that if he lacked the courage to speak out, he could scarcely expect others to stand up and help him, Rob granted two video interviews to Canadian YouTube commentators about his case. While the interviews garnered a sharp initial interest, the commentators who granted them quickly found themselves under threats of litigation. Rob’s first interview was immediately taken down. Rob’s second interviewer, Laura-Lynn Thompson, faced similar threats, but initially refused to take her video (not currently available in Canada) down.

    Last Thursday, Justice Michael Tammen of the British Columbia Supreme Court ordered that Thompson’s interview and various social media posts be taken down. When Thompson stalled, trying to keep a rapidly sharing copy of her interview available to Canadians on Bitchute, the police were sent to her house to demand she take the video down.

    Tammen also harshly reprimanded Rob for speaking about his case to the media, warning him that if he broke his silence again, he would likely be cited for contempt of court.

    I haven’t said it in a while, but…Twilight Zone.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Judge Amy Berman, on the sentencing of Roger Stone:

    He was prosecuted for covering up for the President.

    This is simply not true. Neither the president nor anyone else has been charged with anything that Stone might have been “covering up”.

    This is precisely the problem, in my view, with the obstruction of justice charge. How could justice be said to have been obstructed, when there was no underlying crime for which justice might be said to have been required? Perjury? If he lied under oath, then he is guilty of perjury. Witness tampering? The circumstances are debateable, but fine. Obstruction of justice? I don’t see how. Exactly what “justice” was obstructed?

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    • You can obstruct the investigation even if the person is never charged.

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      • jnc:

        You can obstruct the investigation even if the person is never charged.

        Sure, but you can’t have obstructed justice if there is no justice being served by the investigation.

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        • While that may be a great philosophical argument, as a legal one I don’t think it holds.

          By definition, obstructing an investigation is obstructing justice.

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Obstruction_of_justice

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        • jnc:

          While that may be a great philosophical argument, as a legal one I don’t think it holds.

          Perhaps not, but the question I have is, why not? It seems very strange that a charge of obstruction of justice doesn’t actually require that justice was, er, obstructed.

          I’d also be interested in other instances where someone was charged with and convicted of obstruction of justice in an investigation of a crime that never actually happened.

          Another question…what exactly were the obstructive acts? From the articles I have read, it seems that it was lying to congress and witness tampering that constituted the obstruction charges. But those two things are separate crimes in and of themselves, and he was charged separately for those things. So surely there must be some additional element that turns those already criminal acts into an additional criminal act. What is that element, if not interference with the the investigation/prosecution of some other underlying crime, which it can’t have been in this case since there was no other underlying crime?

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  9. Interesting to see if this works and if Trump gets any credit for it.

    “Pompeo, Taliban announce plan to sign peace deal at the end of the month”

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/violence-reduction-in-afghanistan-set-to-begin-after-midnight-saturday/2020/02/21/c3df0fb2-547d-11ea-80ce-37a8d4266c09_story.html

    Like

  10. It was ugly, but it looks like it worked:

    “Trump’s ‘Remain in Mexico’ program dwindles as more immigrants are flown to Guatemala or are quickly deported

    The tent camps in Mexican cities are dwindling and the flow of Central American migrants has dropped precipitously, in part because many asylum seekers say they do not want to end up in Guatemala and often now see the dangerous journey north as a fruitless risk.”

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/immigration/remain-in-mexico-deportation-asylum-guatemala/2020/02/20/9c29f53e-4eb7-11ea-9b5c-eac5b16dafaa_story.html

    And a possible side benefit:

    “Top suspect in Mexican drug cartel handed over to U.S. amid surge of extraditions

    The extradition of Rubén Oseguera González, also known as El Menchito, comes after pressure from the Trump administration.”

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/the_americas/suspected-mexican-cartel-figure-handed-over-to-us-amid-surge-of-extraditions/2020/02/21/c708eec0-54b3-11ea-80ce-37a8d4266c09_story.html

    Like

    • Interesting article Brent. I happen to agree with it if I’m being honest. Bloomberg fails as a candidate on many fronts. I actually didn’t realize the entirety of his problems until recently.

      I do think Trump has elevated our national discourse to a terrible tone and while Dems have demonstrated the kind of verbal outrage and language I don’t approve of in response, they’re also stabbing themselves in the foot. It seems no one is safe any longer.

      Where is the perfect person with a perfect history of treating women and people of other colors equitably ALL the time? That person doesn’t exist. If I have a standard that won’t allow me to vote for Trump then I can’t justifiably vote for Bloomberg either. I am taking note of the more minor transgressions of the rest of the field however.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Where is the perfect person with a perfect history of treating women and people of other colors equitably ALL the time?

        In 2012 I would have said Mitt Romney but at the time I was told Binders full of Women, he haircut raped someone 55 years prior and he gave a woman cancer. I realized that Milton Friedman was right and Romney’s subsequent behavior as well as Trump’s behavior in office proved it.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Ahhhhhh McWing the heady days of Obama v Romney! I don’t remember all those “accusations” against Romney. What is a haircut rape……………it must have something to do with drinking, am I right? And as far as I know the only way to give a woman cancer is by passing the hpv virus on to her. That actually happened to my daughter but luckily she hasn’t gotten cancer……….yet.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Romney was accused of giving some kid a haircut while both in high school, supposedly the dude was gay. There was a commercial that ran in the NE that accused Romney of giving a woman cancer when he was at Bain Capital. The Binders full of Women was a meme that was ubiquitous throughout the latter half of the campaign. The smearing of Romney rivaled the libel that was leveled at Goldwater in 63/4.

          Like

        • You have a much better memory than I do McWing. All I remember is fighting like hell for Obama to win. I am going to be 70 in about 6 weeks so maybe my memory is going? I do have a tendency to tune out things that don’t matter to me though.

          Liked by 1 person

        • McWing:

          I realized that Milton Friedman was right and Romney’s subsequent behavior as well as Trump’s behavior in office proved it.

          I think you are correct.

          Liked by 1 person

      • I liked the “if everything is problematic, nothing is”

        reminds me of the “if everything is a priority, nothing is”

        Liked by 2 people

      • lms:

        Where is the perfect person with a perfect history of treating women and people of other colors equitably ALL the time?

        Right here! And even better, I also treat men equitably all the time too!

        Liked by 1 person

    • I don’t even know what that means? I doubt it’s true but on the off chance it is maybe they like him because he’s a Socialist………? lol

      Like

      • It’s breeding paranoia in the Democratic primaries. See PL comments for a taste of it.

        The Russiagate media coverage has made everyone lose their minds.

        If you haven’t seen this, it’s recommended:

        “It’s official: Russiagate is this generation’s WMD
        The Iraq war faceplant damaged the reputation of the press. Russiagate just destroyed it

        Matt Taibbi
        Mar 23, 2019”

        https://taibbi.substack.com/p/russiagate-is-wmd-times-a-million

        See also this:

        “We’re in a permanent coup
        Americans might soon wish they just waited to vote their way out of the Trump era
        Matt Taibbi
        Oct 11, 2019

        My discomfort in the last few years, first with Russiagate and now with Ukrainegate and impeachment, stems from the belief that the people pushing hardest for Trump’s early removal are more dangerous than Trump. Many Americans don’t see this because they’re not used to waking up in a country where you’re not sure who the president will be by nightfall. They don’t understand that this predicament is worse than having a bad president. ”

        https://taibbi.substack.com/p/were-in-a-permanent-coup

        Like

        • Jnc, I can’t get into the WaPo but you know I love Taibbi so I’ll read that.

          Sometimes I think, and I’m probably wrong, that all you guys spend too much time reading the opinions and dire warnings of those in the media and believe it a bit too much. I’m not criticizing but I think the media doesn’t actually have a handle on normal, living their life everyday, Americans who really don’t give a crap about some of this stuff.

          Maybe we should care more but who can we trust to tell us the truth of it?

          Like

        • “I think the media doesn’t actually have a handle on normal, living their life everyday, Americans who really don’t give a crap about some of this stuff.”

          Oh I completely agree, and Twitter has made it a million times worse.

          This is mostly entertainment for us.

          Like

  11. At my house, Walter likes Steyer and I like Buttigieg. I’ll probably throw some money Pete’s way this weekend. He’s 2nd in the polls in NV so may pick up a few delegates. Biden will take S Carolina though.

    I forget which polls you guys watch. I linked an NBC/WSJ one earlier thinking it might have some validity and everyone poo poohed it. Is Nate Silver any better in your opinion? Or should I just keep this shit to myself?

    Like

  12. LOL

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  13. For everyone up in arms over the Barr/Stone event, this is what the politicization of the justice system actually looks like:

    https://thefederalist.com/2020/02/21/california-court-arraigns-david-daleiden-on-10-felony-counts-for-exposing-abortion-industry-secrets/

    Like

    • Sure, selective prosecution based on political stance is politicization of the justice system.

      Doesn’t make Barr’s actions acceptable.

      I suppose my lack of outrage there is I had higher expectations of Barr that I didn’t have for Harris or California.

      Like

      • jnc:

        Doesn’t make Barr’s actions acceptable.

        I still think you are making an unwarranted/un-evidenced assumption about what his actions actually were.

        Like

  14. Worth reading.

    https://www.theamericanconservative.com/dreher/postcard-from-pre-totalitarian-america/

    This academic year I’ve had an opportunity to work with some early-career academics. These are newly-minted PhDs that are in their first year on the tenure-track. What’s really scary is that they sincerely believe all the woke dogma. Older people – those in their forties, fifties or sixties – might parrot the woke mantras because it’s what everybody in academia does and you have to survive. But the younger generation actually believes it all. Transwomen are women, black students fail calculus because there are no calc profs who “look like them,” ‘whiteness’ is the most oppressive thing in the world, the US is the most evil country in history, anybody who votes Republican is a racist, everybody who goes to church is a bigot but the hijab is deeply liberating. I gently mocked some of this stuff (like we normally do among older academics), and two of the younger academics in the group I supervise actually cried. Because they believe all this so deeply, and I’d even say fanatically, that they couldn’t comprehend why I wasn’t taking it seriously.

    The fanatical glimmer in their eyes really scared me.

    Back in the USSR in the 1970s and the 1980s nobody believed the dogma. People repeated the ideological mantras for cynical reasons, to get advanced in their careers or get food packages. Many did it to protect their kids. But nobody sincerely believed. That is what ultimately saved us. As soon as the regime weakened a bit, it was doomed because there were no sincere believers any more. Everybody who did take the dogma seriously belonged to the generation of my great-grandparents.

    In the US, though, the generation of the fanatical believers is only now growing up and coming into its prime. We’ll have to wait until their grandkids grow up to see a generation that will be so fed up with the dogma that it will embrace freedom of thought and expression. But that’s a long way away in the future.

    Like

    • I have always thought this crop of leftists are cut from the same cloth as the Jacobins, the Communists and the Progressives of the early 20th century. I could easily see them holding struggle sessions.

      Ultimately, they have to be endured and frustrated at every attempt to gain control. Hopefully they stick to academia and corporate HR departments where they can’t screw up too much. I don’t think the overall public is buying into this.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Especially where the market is concerned. Chick-Fil-A May survive going woke if they don’t change their product—but the entertainment industry will have a harder time. And it is—just slowly.

        Like

  15. Scott, that all seems a bit over the top to me. I know a lot of PhD’s, some are even teaching, and none of them believe Transwomen are women, black students fail calculus because there are no calc profs who “look like them,” ‘whiteness’ is the most oppressive thing in the world, the US is the most evil country in history, anybody who votes Republican is a racist, everybody who goes to church is a bigot but the hijab is deeply liberating. My daughter has worked for equity in the workplace because her company was bleeding very talented and experienced women who were looked over for promotions and not given enough leeway in child care. She also sought paternity leave for men. There are actually worthwhile advantages in establishing and maintaining a workforce that is diverse.

    I admit I didn’t read the entire piece because it was over the top in cynicism and seemed somewhat hysterical to me but I doubt this is a country wide problem and may have been exaggerated by the author. Just my opinion. My family is full of young professionals with Masters and PhD’s who are very level headed as are their friends. They’re also a diverse group politically and very well read and informed.

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    • I imagine it had a lot to do with which school you are at. And in one part of the country you live. I imagine you don’t run into as many of them—or maybe not any—in business categories where data trumps feelings. So working for an oil company will be very different from being on the tenure track at UCLA.

      Like

      • Kevin, it’s true that most of the young people I know are scientists although my oldest daughter and her lawyer husband work in the non-profit sector and so we know lots of people teaching and working up in the SF area who would be embarrassed to read this. My daughter is very liberal but would never say those things…………..although admittedly she is older than the students this guy seems to be talking about. She went to a very liberal art school here in So Cal for her Master’s and honestly, even though one guy showed up at the graduation in a Gumby outfit, the kids were mostly pretty normal kids.

        I remember being a brat at that age though and growing out of it so maybe there’s hope for the next generation!

        Liked by 1 person

        • I think there is hope. I also think so of what is considered “woke” culture is an overlap with the narcissism epidemic. What we’re seeing is growing pathological narcissism, and it often gets expressed in wokeness. The whole point of virtue signalling is scratching a narcissistic itch.

          But there’s always hope. And there will always be those who want something better than a life of fact-free emotionalizing and socially acceptable (but still pathological) narcissism.

          Like

      • What was the student movement of the Obama years called again? I remember all of us wondering how far they would go and questioning their assertions. That was just another flash in the pan of college students questioning authority and making rash judgements. It’s part of their development!!! 😉

        Like

    • lms:

      I know a lot of PhD’s, some are even teaching, and none of them believe…

      The author was specifically talking about “newly-minted PhDs that are in their first year on the tenure-track”.

      Are you familiar with the Brett Weinstein episode at Evergreen State College from a couple years ago? If not I recommend these videos. They are well worth the time. It is an extreme, but I don’t think entirely atypical, example of the kinds of ideas that college students are being indoctrinated into. Even those in the hard sciences.

      Liked by 1 person

  16. This should be good:

    “Note on a new book
    On the Great Russia Caper

    Matt Taibbi
    Dec 31, 2019”

    https://taibbi.substack.com/p/note-on-a-new-book

    Like

  17. TV notes:

    Narcos Mexico Season 2 dropped last week on Netflix – recommended.

    Better Call Saul Season 5 starts tonight.

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    • jnc:

      Better Call Saul Season 5 starts tonight.

      Do you know if it is streamable?

      Like

      • I don’t believe so. If it is, I think you’ll have to pay per episode or for a season on either Apple or Amazon.

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        • jnc:

          If it is, I think you’ll have to pay per episode or for a season on either Apple or Amazon.

          Got home and discovered it it is on Netflix, at least here in the UK.

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        • The new season or Season 4?

          Netflix just dropped Season 4 which was the last one. They are always one behind.

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        • jnc:

          The new season or Season 4?

          The new season. Only the first episode so far, but it says a new episode is available Feb 25, and then every week after that until Mar 24. Looks like only 6 episodes in season 5. Must be a UK thing.

          Like

    • It’s a joke.

      Edit: My solution would be to have Northern Virginia (everything north of Fredericksburg, basically where the I-95 express lanes start) merge with DC if they get statehood. They are all basically part of DC anyway and having them in the same government unit would simplify transportation planning which is their primary local government concern.

      Like

      • jnc:

        It’s a joke.

        Too bad. I think it would be fascinating to see it unfold.

        Like

      • jnc:

        My solution would be to have Northern Virginia (everything north of Fredericksburg, basically where the I-95 express lanes start) merge with DC if they get statehood.

        That would be great too, although I am not sure I want the Swamp to get state status.

        Like

    • Unfortunately, leftists won’t let righties go, they’d rather forcibly hold them than an amicable divorce.

      Like

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