OPEN THREAD 4/6/15

Wiscy has a 53% chance against the Dukies, according to Nate Silver.

Doesn’t mean any single game would be close, of course, and Duke beat Wiscy by ten or twelve early in the year (I forget the exact score).

 

The Economist explains the outlined Iran deal here:

http://tinyurl.com/lu9sbbx

 

Latest Alzheimers research news is here:

http://tinyurl.com/l9ojy7t

 

NoVA, did you know that you can watch NHL games on your computer at CBC.com?

 

I am going off the cable at the end of the month.  Going to use Roku with some subscription services.  Has anyone here already cut the cord to ATT, ComCast, Cox, TWC, Dish, DirecTV?  Tell, please.

 

 

12 Responses

  1. You may find this of interest for over the air TV recording and streaming:

    https://www.tablotv.com/

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  2. I am still shaking my head wondering what happened to Wisconsin down the stretch. Take a 9 point lead in the 2nd and then completely fall apart.

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    • Wiscy also got jobbed on that call – that the ball was tipped out of bounds by a Dukie was clear from 2 replay angles.

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  3. Mark — I cut cable years ago. I use a roku attached to a “dumb” tv along with an over-the-air antenna attached to a 7 or so year old 40 inch samsung LCD.

    downstairs, i have and 60 inch LCD samsung smart TV that is basically a built in roku. i also have an amazon fire stick attached to it. basically a roku but geared toward amazon prime. we bought one for a gift and accidentally ordered 2 and I decided to keep it.

    I have a netflix account that works on either platform. also amazon prime. and an M-Go and VuDu account, which are on-demand movie streaming rental services (pay-per view about $2-$5 per movie. I also have a Hulu account. but that might drop as services like the one JNC linked get better.

    These options are all very easy to use and pass the WAF — wife acceptance factor. They are essentially plug and play. I do find that I sometimes have to re-enter passwords/usernames for M-Go after a power failure.

    Somewhat more advanced

    I run a media server called Plex that handles all my locally stored media. I have a n old mac mini hooked into my network just a medial server for all the DVDs/Blurays that i’ve stored on a hard drive. and yes, anything that i’ve downloaded with bittorrent. that means all my DVDs are in a box in storage and i find my movies like you would on netflix. Plex is just anohter app that you can install on your smart TV or roku.

    I also pay for the NHL gamecenter to watch hockey. I use a VPN to get around blackouts. sometimes if a game is blacked out in DC, i can input over to the mac mini, turn on the VPN and pretend in in another US city or even overseas. quality is pretty good when you do that. we haven’t missed cable at all.

    i’m also considering slingtv for ESPN and once football is back. and HBO will have a service too that i might get. i’m not sure if it’s a savings anymore, but i’m buying what i want when i want without the clutter of a cable package.

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  4. I got a Comcast deal where I get HBO plus super-basic cable (basically, ABC, NBC, CBS, CSPAN, PBS and a dozen home shopping channels and a few religious channels and something called Ion) + Internet for $69. Then everything else is Hulu and Netflix. As ISPs are limited if you want fast access here. I also got rid of our land line, with mixed results, as I think I’m going to have to get my wife a new iPhone. The iPhone 4 doesn’t have great reception out where we live, where as the iPhone 6 works fine. I tried getting a Microcell, but it just has it’s own problem with the iPhone 4, as it periodically switches from Microcell to whatever distant cell tower gives us poor coverage, and the switch always drops the call. I don’t have that problem (in the house) with the iPhone 6. But then, you end up spending more money.

    So, a quasi-cord cutter with mixed results.

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    • Thanx to both NoVA and KW. I will have time to build a hardware system like yours, NoVA, after 8-31. Thanx for the take on what services to subscribe to. We have Netflix and watch on our smart TVs/BR-DVDs. But I have seen full Roku, and it will pass the wife approval test – she claims the smart dvd is too difficult. Hulu+ and Acorn are likely addns for us.

      KW, if your internet service gets up to speed I recommend a VOIP box service [no computer connection req] to go with your cell phone. I use Ooma for a two line service and it is great – unlimited USA calls for $10/mo plus tax. Of course, with fast internet, you will get good reception over wifi for your cell phone when you are at home.

      We are supposed to have Google gigabyte in my neighborhood by the end of 2015. Right now I am on ATT which has fibre to the box across the street but twisted strand from the box 85′ to my house. I am at about 46-48 mb to my router and half that by wifi to the rest of the house. When I go to the google for internet I will pay $70/mo.

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  5. if you do, no reason to spend a lot. i found an old mac mini on ebay.

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  6. Mark: they have Google Internet up in Nashville, as I understand it. But not here. I will look at Ooma. I used a computer based VoIP for awhile a few years ago–MagicJack–and it was awful!

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    • Kev – Ooma has worked extremely well for me with good bells and whistles. Take a look aat their website.

      All – New quote up in honor of new baseball season.

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      • Mark:

        With regard to our on-going discussion of due process, I am definitely confused about when you said this:

        And do you think the 14th A. could be said to require a state not to restrict the right to bear arms without due process if there were no 2d A.? I don’t.

        Can you clarify what it is you don’t think, because I would have bet anything that you agree the 14th requires states to provide due process with regard to any law it wishes to enforce.

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        • Without the 2d A., a state, or the feds, could statutorily prohibit private ownership of weapons. There could be no argument made in a courtroom that a citizen’s “right” to bear arms had been abridged without due process of law, because the “right” to bear arms would not exist.

          From your comments, you think that a legislative enactment in proper form meets the requirement of due process in and of itself. It does not, in a complete sense, and it does not, at all, if the law violates the Constitution. I think you are arguing that even if one has no substantive right – say, the right to bear arms – when one is accused of violating the law one can be duly processed, which is true, but which is irrelevant to whether the putative right claimed is indeed a legal right. Claiming that right when it did not exist would not be successful.

          We agree, I think, that whatever we define as a legal right cannot be taken without due process. Thus if we argue that the 2dA gives rise to a constitutional right to bear arms, then we can argue that an attempt to take away that right, short of a constitutional amendment, is violative of due process. This is what is relevant to how federal substantive constitutional rights are imposed in favor of citizens against states.

          Scott, I hope that is enough to put this to rest for the time being.

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        • Mark:

          Without the 2d A., a state, or the feds, could statutorily prohibit private ownership of weapons. There could be no argument made in a courtroom that a citizen’s “right” to bear arms had been abridged without due process of law, because the “right” to bear arms would not exist.

          You seem to be saying that as long as a law is constitutional, it cannot possibly be administered without due process. How can that possibly be true?

          Earlier you listed three traditional metrics of proper due process:

          First, a statute must be explicit enough to put a reasonable man on notice of what it allows and prohibits – and, in a criminal case, it must be VERY specific.

          Second, one is entitled to notice of the complaint against him.

          Third, one is entitled to a fair and impartial hearing with a right to confront the evidence against oneself and produce evidence of one’s own.

          Even if there were no 2nd amendment, and no constitutional right to bear arms, the enforcement of a law designed to prohibit possession of firearms could still fall afoul of one of these. How would such an occurrence not produce a due process claim?

          I think you are arguing that even if one has no substantive right – say, the right to bear arms – when one is accused of violating the law one can be duly processed, which is true, but which is irrelevant to whether the putative right claimed is indeed a legal right.

          And the inverse of that must also be true, ie whether or not the putative right claimed is a legal one is irrelevant to whether one has been duly processed, and hence then also irrelevant to a due process claim. Which is what I have been arguing all along. In a due process claim, the only relevant right should be the right to, well, due process. As I said earlier, the prohibition on deprivation of life, liberty or property “without due process” very clearly implies that depriving someone of life, liberty, and property is allowed, but only once due process has been followed. Stated another way, from the perspective of the citizen, in the absence of due process citizens have the right to do literally anything they want without punishment. Hence, in order for the government to impose any punishment for any violation, it must first provide for due process.

          There are, of course, things that citizens have a right to do regardless of whether or not due process has been followed, such as those things contained in the first and second amendments. Which is why I keep saying that those amendments represent restrictions on what the government can do over and above the due process restriction.

          We agree, I think, that whatever we define as a legal right cannot be taken without due process.

          I do not agree. This implies that it can be taken with due process, and that is wrong. The right to bear arms, or the right to free speech, cannot be taken under any circumstances. That is the whole point of the first and second amendment.

          Thus if we argue that the 2dA gives rise to a constitutional right to bear arms, then we can argue that an attempt to take away that right, short of a constitutional amendment, is violative of due process.

          No, I would not argue that it is violative of due process (under the 5th amendment), because it is not the “process” that has been violated. It is the 2nd amendment itself, under which there is no process by which the right can be taken, that has been violated. You seem to think “process” encompasses a non-process restictions. I do not see any justification or rationale for thinking that.

          However, if we adopt your position, then the incorporation of the first and second amendments still does not follow. On its face, the first amendment does not apply to state governments, as it explicitly says that “congress” shall make no law. Therefore, since there is no right to free speech or religion with regard to state governments, then such a restriction would by your definition not be violative of due process.

          Scott, I hope that is enough to put this to rest for the time being.

          We can stop any time you want. But I am even more convinced now than before that the incorporation doctrine, particularly with regard to the first and second amendments, has no sensible rationale in the 14th amendment.

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